The Remains of Britain's Steam Age Railway
42
Glasgow and its Tunnels

Page 3



.. ..
60,59,58,57,56,55,54,53,52,51,49,48,47,46,45,44,43<--Go to page Go to page -->41,40,39,38,37,36,35,34,33,32,31




Index and Map

Link to the pre 2011 Pages

Link to pages 1-30

Continuing this tour of Glasgow, this page broadly covers the western district of the city starting
with the shot above looking into Balgray Tunnel with the very end of the platforms of Kelvinside Station showing.




Southern Portal of Crow Road Tunnel at the start of the Caledonian Railways route that skirted the north side of the city via Possil.
11/10/2016

Northern Portal of Crow Road Tunnel, like so many lines around the City, in a deep stone faced cutting.
11/10/2016

Soutern end of Crow Road Station.
11/10/2016

Island platform at Crow Road Station, the main buildings at street level were supported by these Iron girders.
11/10/2016

Southern portal of Kelvinside Tunnel where it passes under the North British
Railways route to Clydebank. The shot is taken from the 1960 Hyndland Station.
11/10/2016

Approximate location of the northern portal of Kelvinside Tunnel, the whole
area has been transformed with the development of Gartnavel General Hospital.
11/10/2016

Circa 1895 map showing the first Hyndland Station, of interest is the dotted line in the V of the running lines showing Kelvinside
Tunnel under construction and on the left a part of the hospital that existed then, which was named 'Royal Lunatic Asylum' How times have changed!

Looking towards the buffers at the terminus station at Hyndland.
20/10/2016

The view down to the platforms at Hyndland. The branch was electrified and a depot for servicing the Blue Trains
was located here, although passenger services were steam hauled untill the end in 1960. The electric depot closed in 1987.
20/10/2016

A small reminder of the past at Hyndland.
20/10/2016

The main building at Hyndland was in the gap in front of the Newsagents.
20/10/2016

Returning to the Possil line, this is Kelvinside Station.
20/10/2016

The entrance to Balgray Tunnel under the main building at Kelvinside.
20/10/2016

Outline of the staircase down to the Possil platform. Kelvinside Station closed for a couple of
years during the First World War and then closed for good in 1942 but hung on for freight untill 1966.
20/10/2016

Stub of platform remaining at Kelvinside and possible Gents?

Kelvinside Station.
20/10/2016

Kelvinside Station across the Great Western Road.
20/10/2016

Circa 1895 map showing Balgray Tunnel under construction, Kelvinside Station was at the left bottom, the route opened in 1896.

Looking at the remains of Kelvinside Station platforms from the southern portal of Balgray Tunnel.
20/10/2016

The rather bleak view of Balgray Tunnel.
20/10/2016

Eastern portal of Balgray Tunnel.
20/10/2016

After leaving Balgray Tunnel the route was joined by the Dawsholm branch at
Bellshaugh Junction and then shortly after the line turned North East to cross the Kelvin.
A triangle was built here, part of which was above the river, an arch of the other bridge can just be seen.
20/10/2016

Footpath under the Kelvin Bridge.
20/10/2016

View looking South West across the Kelvin. Kelvinbridge and Dawsholm to the right, Botanic Gardens straight ahead.
20/03/2017

Circa 1895 map showin g the triangle and two bridges across the Keliv. Kelvinbridge and
Dawsholm are to the top left, Maryhill Central top right and Botanic Gardens is at the bottom.


A wintery view acros the Kelvin, not quite so much foliage.
20/03/2017

Looking to the right from the previous shot, these arches support the Kelvinbridge route above the Kelvin.
20/03/2017

View West across the bridge.
20/03/2017

The Telegraph Pole is a remarkable survivor and reminder of a different world of communication.
20/03/2017

The bridge curving around to Kelvinside North Junction and Maryhill Central.
20/03/2017

This shot is taken on the arches seen in an earlier view. looking East.
20/03/2017

Kelvin Bridge, they came a lot more elaborate than this.
20/03/2017

Kelvin Bridge.
20/03/2017

After the bridges over the Kelvin the route came to Maryhill Central Station
(Barracks at this time). Tamshill No. 1 Tunnel is at the top, taking the line under the Forth & Clyde Canal. Circa 1895.

The sad site at Marhill Central looking West, the only hint is the infilled overbridge.
20/03/2017

Tamshill Tunnels Nos. 1,2 and 3 from left to right, all have been infilled save for the top of No. 1. Circa 1895.

Tamshill No.1 Tunnel Western Portal, the only reminder of the
massive amount of effort, and no doubt lifes that this stretch of the line cost.
20/3/2017

Tamshill Tunnel No. 1, in the summer you would never know it was there.
The continuation of this route through Possil will be concluded on the final page of my Glasgow adventure.
20/03/2017

Continuing where I started on page 1 with the line from Stobcross, this is the northern
portal of Kelvingrove Tunnel. I am very slowly getting the hang of all these different Kelvins.
20/03/2017

Standing back from the previous shot, the tunnel portal can just be
glimpsed where the couple are heading under the Eldon St Bridge over the Kelvin.
20/03/2017

Turning through One Hundred and Eighty degrees and a very short walk we come to the site of Kelvin Bridge Station.
20/03/2017

Part of Kelvin Bridge Station was under ground, this view is from the up platform looking North West.
20/03/2017

The site of the street level building at Kelvin Bridge, the station closed in 1952 and the whole route in 1960.
20/03/2017

Looking down from the Great Western Road at Kelvin Bridge Station, part of which
spanned the Kelvin. At this point the Subway passes underneath both the station and the river.
20/03/2017

The view looking South East down to Kelvin Bridge Station from above the portal of Great Western Road Tunnel.
20/03/2017

Eastern portal of Great Western Road Tunnel.
20/03/2017

The very elegant Great Western Road Bridge across the Kelvin.
20/03/2017

Looking down at the subterranean Botanic Gardens Station, closed in 1939.
14/07/2016

Botanic Gardens Station, a favourite with explorers.
14/07/2016

Botanic Gardens Station.
14/07/2016

Botanic Gardens Station.
14/07/2016

Still in the grounds of the Botanic Gardens, is the northern portal of Botanic Gardens Tunnel.
14/07/2016

Northern portal of Botanic Gardens Tunnel.
14/07/2016

A short distance from Botanic Gardens Tunnel is Kirklee Station.
14/07/2016

Kirklee Station, Botanic Gardens Tunnel can be seen through the trees.
14/07/2016

The view north at Kirklee Station, the platforms continued on the bridge over Ford Road.
14/07/2016

Kirklee Station.
14/07/2016

The whole area of Kirklee Station and Botanic Gardens Tunnel was fenced off over the winter of 2016-7, I would
have thought it would have been a lot cheaper and simpler to build a solid wall and access door in the tunnel portal instead.
14/07/2016

The bridge over Ford Road. Kirklee Station ran across the top.
14/07/2016

The southern Junction of the triangle shown in the earlier photos was just north of Kirklee Station,
the lines had already split by the time they passed under Kirklee Road, this is the infilled route to Dawsholm.
14/07/2016

Ths is now the South to East side of the triangle crossing the Kelvin.
14/07/2016

View looking North up the Kelvin, with both bridges visible.
14/07/2016

Kelvin Bridge.
14/07/2016

Kelvin Bridge.
14/07/2016

Travelling North , bottom right is the northern junction of the triangle, and in the
middle is Bellshaugh Junction with the Lanarkshire & Dumbartonshire line going off to the
left into Balgray Tunnel and the Glasgow Central Line continuing North to Dawsholm, with
both companies having running powers over the short stretch of track in the middle. Circa 1895.

The Glasgow Central Railways route to Dawsholm re-crossed the Kelvin immediately after Bellshaugh Junction.
20/10/2016

Past Dawsholm the line did a Ninety Degree turn to the West and re-crossed the Kelvin,
this line to Temple Gasworks did not open untill 1896 so is not shown on the previous map.
20/10/2016

Looking south down the Kelvin at the piers of the Temple Gasworks Bridge.
20/10/2016

A close up of the Temple Gasworks piers show the piers of yet another railway crossing of the Kelvin in
the distance, I am not sure of what this other line served other than some works adjacent to Kelvindale House.
20/10/2016

View of the Temple Gasworks piers looking North, behind is the stone Aqueduct of the Forth & Clyde Canal.
20/10/2016

A 1930s map shows all the lines complete. The line from Botanic Gardens comes up at the bottom right, Dawsholm Engine
Shed is the grey oblong building, across the river from here is Kelvingrove House and its mysterious private line, Dawsholm Station was
where the word 'Maryhill' is but had closed in 1908, a life span of only 12 years, opposite the station site is the Temple Gasworks branch which
crossed the Kelvin and goes straight into Kelvindale Tunnel. There was another route and tunnel into the Gasworks from the North British line which can
be seen in the very centre of the map, where the tunnel passes under the canal.

Eastern portal of Kelvindale Tunnel.
20/10/2016

Kelvindale Tunnel.
20/10/2016

The very rural setting above Kevindale Tunnel, it seems very much at odds
with the work stained views of Dawsholms Austerities just across the water.
20/10/2016

Western portal of Kelvindale Tunnel closed 1920.
20/10/2016

This is a view east from the 2005 opened Kelvindale Station, the
North British route to Temple Gasworks went through the right hand arch.
20/10/2016

Temple Gasworks is bottom left, Temple Gasworks Tunnel is in the middle towards the bottom, the map is circa 1895 so too early to show the route from Dawsholm.

Temple Gasworks Tunnel Northern Portal.
20/10/2016

Maryhill Station looking west, this was the North British route over the top of Glasgow,
the station was closed in 1961 and re-opened in 1993, it maybe basic but at least it is open.
20/10/2016
ll   Back to top
60,59,58,57,56,55,54,53,52,51,49,48,47,46,45,44,43<--Go to page Go to page -->41,40,39,38,37,36,35,34,33,32,31